Tag Archives: PR

Beyond the Dashboard and Under the Hood | #SMBC5

From discussing the importance of having a social hub to setting up a dashboard and diving deep under the analytics hood, I covered some important tools, metrics and trends that can help you improve the effectiveness of your social media and web marketing strategy.

Having a social hub in place allows you to not only own your content (imagine if your Facebook page suddenly disappeared), but also track analytics and trends that can be used to make informed decisions about strategy. One of the best (and free) tools available is Google Analytics. A number of widgets are available that can provide valuable information about traffic, content performance, and more.

In addition, setting up dashboards to stay on top of your social and web marketing efforts can reduce time and stress. I shared several of the key items that I like to keep track of with my dashboards.

Lastly, insight on trends for 2013 shows that we are becoming more and more mobile, as well as less focused (decreased attention span), so we need to deliver content with repetition, novelty, and in a concise format–all of which that needs to be designed for folks on their tablet, smartphone or other mobile device.

View the PowerPoint slideshow (.ppsx) from my presentation at “Social Media Bootcamp 5.0” on May 16, hosted by the Greater Spokane Chapter of PRSA.

Whitworth #JMC335 Mid-Term Feedback

We’re now halfway through the term at Whitworth University, and it’s my first time teaching the Interactive Journalism (JMC 335) course. The students have been learning about the important role that social media and technology plays in today’s journalism, PR and marketing fields. In addition to classroom lectures, presentations, workshops and readings, they have been required to blog and tweet (and encouraged to tweet beyond the scope of classroom assignments).

While it seems that they have, for the most part, been learning a lot about social media, what I am uncertain of is how well my teaching style is working and whether the readings were relevant (and even being read by the students). So, I followed the advice of the interim department chair, and surveyed the students with a few simple questions, in order to gather feedback and make adjustments if necessary.

Here are the questions:

  1. What has most helped your learning so far in this course?
  2. What has least helped your learning so far in this course?
  3. Please complete this sentence: “I would get more out of this course if I would…”
  4. And this one: “I would get more out of this course if the instructor would…”
  5. The textbook is…

And here’s some of the (generalized) feedback I received:

  • The workshops (Twitter, blogging, FlipCam, etc.) have been beneficial. My intent is to find more opportunities to have more of these.
  • The class period can, admittedly, jump around from time to time. While I do come into class with a lecture plan, it is quite easy to veer off the subject of interject something that seems random. I need to work on a better in-class “game plan.”
  • Some of the students admitted that they haven’t been doing the reading assignments. So, I’ll be investigating some options to hold them more accountable, as the readings are short, easy and relevant.
  • While some haven’t been reading the textbooks, others have noted that they either like the books or don’t. Unfortunately, there isn’t really an ideal textbook out there, that I’ve found, that would cover this course. But, I think the two required textbooks supplement the class well, and The New Rules of Marketing & PR book will be particularly useful for them in the future. After the course, I’ll have to survey the landscape again to see if there are new resources I should be requiring them to read.
  • Yes, for some reason, I refer to kittens a lot in class. Don’t ask me why. I don’t have an obsession for them. However, it seems like kittens are always popular on social media. Perhaps I should diversify the references.
  • They have mentioned the need for a handout. There is one posted on Blackboard for the course, but I’m guessing not everyone has seen it. Be sure to reference (and update as necessary) the handout and provide summaries, too.
  • More examples of social media case studies have been requested as well. I found two in a book that were quite relevant to the journalism aspect of the course. Researching more case studies and sharing them with the class would be helpful.
  • The three-hour class period can be long and monotonous. I should find opportunities to break it up with more breaks, group work, etc.
  • A few more items: sharing latest trends, examples (or instructions) on how to write good blogs, etc.

I also received some great feedback from the interim department chair as well, and I’m already looking at opportunities to incorporate these into the class:

  • Different questioning methods, such as: clusters, individuals by name, and group discussions/answers.
  • Having the students write down one thing they want to share and one thing they didn’t quite understand (or have questions about) regarding the reading, at the beginning of class, to help hold them accountable.
  • Require them to write about the readings for some of their blog posts.
  • Find the intersection between “redundancy” and “novelty” (used in “Information Theory”) in class time.

I think that with all of this feedback, I can help the second part of the course be even more interactive and engaging for the students.

 

Social Media for Insurance & Financial Services (NAIFA #PDX)

Earlier today a delivered this presentation to the Portland chapter of the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors. I shared some ideas, strategies and tips on how they could use social media for their industries.

Social Media for Small Business 2.0

I recently held a workshop hosted by the Forest Grove Chamber of Commerce on how to use social media for your small business. The workshop was designed to be at the “201 level” — getting beyond the basics, and into more about content development, strategy, campaigns and more. Here are the slides that guided are workshop, which include stats, tips and resources.

Mayo Clinic Success Stories: Why social media? | presentation by @KathyBarbour at @prsaspokane #hcsm

Kathy Barbour, APR, the communications manager at the Mayo Clinic spoke at a Spokane PRSA workshop on Sept. 8, 2011. She shared some of their success stories and how they are integrating social media into their communication strategies. The following are my raw notes from her presentation.

Their history and heritage are still a vital part of who they are. It’s included in their speeches, emails, facilities, conversations, etc. They celebrate heritage days annually.

Mayo Clinic is an integrated healthcare provider. They have electronic medical records that are shared between their physicians, sites, etc.

They’ve never done any national advertising. Instead they rely on word-of-mouth, stories in the media, physician recommendations, followed by advertising, Internet and others.

When they do advertise, they use patient stories and employee profiles to continue the “word-of-mouth” strategy. Their campaign is called “My Answer.”

Their primary value: the needs of the patient come first. Focus on how each employee reflects mission and value.

Posters showing their satisfaction scores are posted on their campuses.

They include a photo in their employee e-newsletter every week. Instead of just the written employee message, they now record their leadership on video and broadcast it.

The strategic plan campaign is called The Mayo Effect. They created a YouTube style video (below) that communicates the messages they had in their written version, but in a visually stimulating way.

They created an opt-in every-other-daily email communication that seems to be popular. About 4,000 out of 56,000 employees have signed up for it.

The Cowans video (below) was captured by a visitor at one of their hospitals and posted it to YouTube. When they heard about it, they tracked it down and cross-promoted it.

They post their social media policies for the public to see. And their staff can access Facebook, Twitter, etc. at work. Fortunately, they haven’t had to fire anyone for social media issues.

Recent social media stats via @jmarkarnold (#mms11)

According to Mark Arnold, lead facilitator at the CUNA 2011 Marketing Management School, here are some recent social media stats.

47% of the online immunity now uses social networking sites.

Facebook has more than 500 million active users worldwide.

Facebook states that 50% of active users log in daily.

More than 200 million Facebook users access their site via mobile devices.

70% of local businesses use Facebook.

More than 30 billion pieces of content shared monthly on Facebook.

Twitter has 200 million registered accounts (56 million are active).

110 million tweets are sent daily.

LinkedIn has 100 million members.

Flickr hosts more than 500 billion images.

200 million views of YouTube videos are via mobile devices each day.

Expected spend of $3.08 billion on social ads in 2011, a 55% increase over 2010.

65% of U.S. adults that use social media say they have received a positive benefit.

Social Media for Small Business v2.0

Small businesses, now more than ever, can leverage social media to garner awareness, connect with current customers and engage potential customers and business partnerships. The presentation below was given at the Forest Grove Chamber of Commerce social media workshop on Monday, May 2, 2011 in Forest Grove, Oregon. I’ve also included a handout that I think attendees (and others) might find useful, and links to some additional resources that we didn’t have enough time to cover.

Presentation: Social Media for Small Business (Adobe PDF)

Handout: Social Media Resources (Adobe PDF)

Additional resources:

  • Competitive analysis tool: Viralheat … great for keeping track of mentions of your business and others on the web
  • Twitter analytics tools: Klout and Twitalyzer … excellent way to see how you’re doing in the Twitterverse, as well as compare yourself to others
  • Monitoring services: Google Alerts and Socialmention … find out where people are talking about your business or other topics on the web
  • Brainstorming/idea tracker tool: Thoughtboxes … a free service that helps you put your thoughts down electronically and access them from anywhere like sticky notes
  • How to manage a Facebook wall: A blog post about how to manage positive and negative conversations on your Facebook wall … perfect resource for any Facebook page administrator
  • Social media measurement: Another blog post targeted at Google Analytics users who want to measure social media