Tag Archives: Facebook

Social Media for Business – Gesa & Pasco Chamber of Commerce “Business Success Series”

Today I had the pleasure of presenting two seminars for the Pasco Chamber of Commerce‘s “Business Success Series” (presented by Gesa Credit Union). The first was a beginner’s track, focused on an overview of some of the most popular channels used (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.), conducting an onboarding process, and the basics of various analytical tools available. The second was an advanced track, covering social media strategies and campaigns, advanced analytics, and a look at what’s on the horizon for social media.

Screen Shot 2015-02-20 at 9.24.31 PM

Download the presentations

You can find the first presentation available for download here (PowerPoint format). And the second presentation available here (also PowerPoint format).

Accompanying materials

There were also two videos that I showed during the presentations. One is the most watched YouTube video (submitted by a regular user/individual):

The other is Erik Qualman‘s #Socialnomics 2015 video:

Lastly, below are the three graphics that I found from Salesforce, depicting the anatomy of Facebook, Twitter and blog posts:

6a00e54ee3905b883301a3fbd5135d970b blueprints-for-perfect-social-media-posts-5-728 The-perfect-facebook-post

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Mayo Clinic Success Stories: Why social media? | presentation by @KathyBarbour at @prsaspokane #hcsm

Kathy Barbour, APR, the communications manager at the Mayo Clinic spoke at a Spokane PRSA workshop on Sept. 8, 2011. She shared some of their success stories and how they are integrating social media into their communication strategies. The following are my raw notes from her presentation.

Their history and heritage are still a vital part of who they are. It’s included in their speeches, emails, facilities, conversations, etc. They celebrate heritage days annually.

Mayo Clinic is an integrated healthcare provider. They have electronic medical records that are shared between their physicians, sites, etc.

They’ve never done any national advertising. Instead they rely on word-of-mouth, stories in the media, physician recommendations, followed by advertising, Internet and others.

When they do advertise, they use patient stories and employee profiles to continue the “word-of-mouth” strategy. Their campaign is called “My Answer.”

Their primary value: the needs of the patient come first. Focus on how each employee reflects mission and value.

Posters showing their satisfaction scores are posted on their campuses.

They include a photo in their employee e-newsletter every week. Instead of just the written employee message, they now record their leadership on video and broadcast it.

The strategic plan campaign is called The Mayo Effect. They created a YouTube style video (below) that communicates the messages they had in their written version, but in a visually stimulating way.

They created an opt-in every-other-daily email communication that seems to be popular. About 4,000 out of 56,000 employees have signed up for it.

The Cowans video (below) was captured by a visitor at one of their hospitals and posted it to YouTube. When they heard about it, they tracked it down and cross-promoted it.

They post their social media policies for the public to see. And their staff can access Facebook, Twitter, etc. at work. Fortunately, they haven’t had to fire anyone for social media issues.

6 Tenets of Social Media

I first joined Twitter on April 18, 2008. Yes, I was not an early adopter. In fact, I only joined because I was curious about this “new” tool that some of my fellow colleagues were talking about. As for the other social networking sites, I had already given up on MySpace, I was very active on Facebook, didn’t have my own blog (unless you count my old LiverJournal account which hadn’t been used for years). So I will admit that Twitter actually re-energized my participation in social media.

And here I am, almost three years and three months later, with 13,337 tweets, 1,159 followers and 1,541 people I follow on my personal Twitter account. My “professional” account has only 469 followers; I follow 647 people and have tweeted 845 times (846 when this post is published). But enough of that small glimpse in time, let’s take a look at the fruits of my labor over the past several years: 6 Tenets of Social Media.

These tenets are grounded in professional experience of developing social media strategies and managing the accounts for institutions of higher learning, non-profit organizations, medical/healthcare organizations and a financial services industry. They are the result of the lessons learned there, as well as the knowledge gleaned from countless blogs, email newsletters, thought leaders, workshops, webinars, conferences, discussions and even academic research.

I invite your feedback and comments. These tenets are just that–guidelines–not laws to obey, but principles to use when making your decisions, formulating your strategy and implementing your tactics. They may change over time, as the technology changes, as the paradigm of social media changes, and as human behavior continues to evolve. But for now, I believe them to be fairly relevant…and hopefully, useful.

1. Be Human
  • Be conversational and friendly.
  • Be responsible; own up to your mistakes.
  • Develop a persona; have a consistent voice if possible.
  • Ask questions and engage your followers.
  • Be playful, but professional, matching your brand’s communication style.
  • Be transparent; don’t lie.
  • Give credit where credit is due.
  • Be unique.
2. Be Diligent
  • Explore the mediums; one may work better than another.
  • Get to know your audience.
  • Set goals and measure results.
  • Align social strategy with marketing and business objectives.
  • Know your tools and services.
  • Stay current on trends.
  • Have a plan for handling negative comments or crisis situations.
3. Be Relevant
  • Stay on topic.
  • Speak (and listen) to your followers.
  • Avoid automation.
  • Use appropriate conventions.
  • Don’t just regurgitate; add value.
  • Measure successes and failures.
  • Stick to your area of expertise.
  • Be a (thought) leader.
4. Be Thoughtful
  • Thank people.
  • Mention others.
  • Promote discourse.
  • Be creative and create excitement.
  • Be smart.
5. Be Timely
  • Respond quickly and accurately.
  • If acknowledging, less than an hour.
  • If the response requires research, acknowledge, then provide the full answer within one business day.
  • Post when appropriate.
  • Build buzz.
6. Be Respectful
  • Moderate the community with fairness.
  • Do not spam or inundate your followers.
  • Acknowledge positive and negative feedback.
  • Share opinions, but avoid speculation.
  • Respect privacy.
  • Disagree respectfully.
  • Think twice before posting.
Special thanks to my mentor and supervisor, Barb Richey for providing initial feedback. And of course, my sincere gratitude for further feedback and input from my social media mentor, Carri Bugbee.

Comparing Facebook profiles vs. groups vs. pages

My former classmate and good friend Julie Saraceno and I met up for coffee at Starbucks the other day to discuss the benefits and drawbacks of using Facebook profiles vs. groups vs. pages. In our line of marketing and communications work, we often field inquiries from groups at our organizations wanting to have a Facebook presence. Some want to create profiles to interact as an organization, due to perceived benefits, while others have a difficult time distinguishing between the purpose of a group and a page. So, we created this little table to help compare the three options. It is by no means exhaustive, and certainly, if you have any feedback, we welcome it! Hopefully you can use it to your advantage too.

Facebook Profile Facebook Group Facebook Page
Intent Individual Specific topic or group; internal Public presence; external
Applications / Plug-ins End-user of applications / plug-ins No application / plug-in support Can deploy applications / plug-ins
Personalized URL Yes No Yes
Host Discussion Forums No Yes No
Private Messaging Message up to 20 friends at one time Message all members to their inbox Can send mass or targeted updates to fans but not delivered to their regular inbox
Status Updates Yes No Yes
Friends Can find and request friends Can invite friends to become group members Users can suggest to their friends that they “like” the page
Friends lists Yes (100 max, 1,000 users/list) No No
Privacy Options Fully customizable Can be public or private group Can restrict age limit of users who interact/see page
Statistics Can manually see friend statistics by viewing profiles of friends (based on privacy settings); can manually see comments/likes No group statistics available except total number of members; can manually see comments/likes Statistics on fan demographics (age, gender, location, etc.) and media consumption, page views, interaction, etc.
Events Can create and invite friends to events; can be public or private Can create and automatically invite all group members to events; can be public or private Can create and post events to wall but not auto invite all fans; admins can invite friends; event is public
Customized Tabs Can not have customized tabs Can not have customized tabs Can have customized tabs and set landing tabs for non-fans
Promotion/Ads Can not promote profile via social ads Can not promote group via social ads Can promote page via social ads
Photos/Videos Can post photos and videos; can tag your friends Can post photos and videos; users can tag friends Can post photos and videos; users can tag friends
Relationships Best for personal relationships with other users Best for short-term relationships with members Best for long-term relationships with constituents
Indexing/Search Available to unregistered users based on privacy settings; not fully indexed Not available to unregistered users Available to unregistered users; information is indexed and can be found in search engines

Update: 10-20-2010 | Here’s a great post that covers more features: Facebook Page or Group